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About Bruce McNeil

Bruce McNeil is an award-winning fine arts photographer exploring environmental themes whose work has received critical acclaim in various parts of the world, including the United States and Canada. His experience has included being a photographer, lightening and dark room technician, and fabricator of the installations at the McCord Museum in the William Notman Photographic Archives, and assistant to the designer and photographer for the MacDonald Steward Foundation that included three funded museums–David M. Steward Museum, Chateau Duffers Museum and Chateau Ramezay Museum, and Notre Dame Church Museum in Montreal, Canada. He was a conservation specialist for the U.S. Forest Service. He has continuum solo and group exhibitions on Anacostia River at the Smithsonian Anacostia Community Museum, Sandy Spring Museum, Reginald F. Lewis Museum of Maryland African-American History & Culture, George Washington University Museum, Parish Gallery, Hill Center Galleries at the Old Naval Hospital, and Anacostia Art Center. He was a panelist and climate photography workshop instructor for the District Department of Energy and Environment and has a permanent art installation on the first exhibited images of the Anacostia River in his tenth solo show at Honfleur Gallery in the George Washington House (circa 1732), at the headquarters of Anacostia Watershed Society. He was the recipient of the East of the River Distinguished Artist Award in 2016. He is the inaugural artist for the I-295 Underpass Tunnel public art mural installation that is the gateway for the 11th Street Bridge Park (slated to open in 2020). McNeil has received local and national attention for his work that captures the stunning artistic elegance of the Anacostia River, other waterways in the region, and throughout the world. His artistic advocacy on behalf of the Anacostia River has influenced environmental and social changes, prompting the Washington Examiner and the Washington Post to give him the titles “DC River Man” and “Washington’s River Man.”

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